Best professional cameras you can buy from Amazon

Are you on the lookout for the best professional camera money can buy? Choosing the best tool for the job might be difficult. Fortunately, we’ve examined all of the greatest professional camera models, from specialized tools to true all-rounders, in our shopping guide. So, whether you’re shooting sports, weddings, or a variety of other subjects, this list will assist you in selecting the best camera.

In 2022, what is the greatest professional camera you can buy? It’s impossible to pick just one choice because each pro’s needs are different. However, the Nikon Z9 is presently our top selection for most paid photographers. With 45.7MP stills, fast burst shooting, and 8K/30p video, it’s the most powerful flagship hybrid we’ve tested. However, it isn’t the ideal option for everyone, especially given the expense.

The Canon EOS 1D X Mark III, for example, is a true speed demon if you prefer the handle of a DSLR. Alternatively, the Canon EOS R3 combines the newest mirrorless technology with a DSLR-style body to provide the best sports and wildlife camera.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: Mirrorless
Lens Mount: Sony FE
Sensor: Full-frame
Resolution: 12MP
Viewfinder: EVF 9,440K dots
Screen: 3.0-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,440K dots
Autofocus: 759-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K up to 120fps

REASONS TO BUY:

Unlimited 4K video recording
Image quality in any lighting condition
Stunning S-Cinetone color profile

REASONS TO AVOID:

Low-resolution stills
CFexpress Type A cards are expensive
 

When 4K video recording is your top priority, the Sony A7S III is without a doubt our best hybrid camera. This is a professional tool that is completely reliable and has no real limitations. Some expected the A7 to be blown away by 6K or 8K video capture, but Sony clearly focused on getting the 4K video correct the first time, with no bad surprises. We have a camera that is technically flawless.

It offers a robust 600g body with nice ergonomics, an articulated screen with full touch control, true effective IBIS, good battery life, and comprehensive 10-bit 4K video frame rates at up to 120fps with no record limit and no overheating. The autofocus system works well, and the rolling shutter is well-controlled.

The dual native ISO 640/ISO 16,000 offers unrivaled low light performance and dynamic range in terms of image quality. Furthermore, the A7S III just received a software upgrade that added the stunning S-Cinetone color profile from the Sony FX9 cine camera. Stills are also stunning if you don’t mind the poor 12MP resolution. The Sony A7S III is so fantastic that we could keep pounding the drum for it.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: Mirrorless
Lens Mount: Canon RF
Sensor: Full-frame
Resolution: 45MP
Viewfinder: EVF 5,760K dots
Screen: 3.2-inch articulating touchscreen, 2,100K dots
Autofocus: 1053-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 12/20fps
Max video resolution: 8K up to 30fps

REASONS TO BUY:

Canon’s most competent stills shooter
Accurate and versatile AF
Effective IBIS

REASONS TO AVOID:

Video recording time limits
Overheating recovery times
Pricey
 

When the Canon EOS R5 was introduced, it set a new standard. The R5 fits all of this into a body that weighs only 650g, with 8K video, 45MP resolution, up to 20fps burst shooting, an EVF with 5.76 million dots, and a 3.2-inch fully articulating touchscreen. It all reads like a wish list full of unrealistic expectations. Is it possible that it’s all too wonderful to be true? For the most part, the EOS R5 exceeds expectations.

Canon’s most capable mirrorless camera for photography is this. The high-resolution sensor is ably backed by an exceptionally effective autofocus mechanism, while the powerful DIGIC X processor devours the camera’s competitive 12fps continuous shooting.

Then there’s the 8K video capture, which isn’t available on any other camera at this price. The video image quality is razor-sharp, thanks to Canon’s first in-body image stabilization (IBIS) system and easily adjusted colour profiles. Overheating with lengthy cooling down intervals is a well-known hazard. As a result, 8K video recording time is limited, making it unsuitable for professionals. Even though there is still a video recording limit, 4K video recording performs better.

Although it isn’t quite hybrid perfection, the EOS R5 remains the most well-rounded camera for professional photographers.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: DSLR
Lens Mount: Canon EF
Sensor: Full-frame
Resolution: 20.1MP
Viewfinder: OVF, 0.76x mag
Screen: 3.2-inch fixed touchscreen, 2,100K dots
Autofocus: 191-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 16/20fps
Max video resolution: 5.5K up to 60fps

REASONS TO BUY:

Exceptional autofocus
No continuous shooting limit for stills
Intuitive new ‘smart controller’
Hugely competent video shooter, too

REASONS TO AVOID:

Lacks IBIS
Fixed LCD screen
Expensive
 

The Canon EOS 1D X III is the company’s flagship DSLR, and it’s a camera that’s frequently seen in the hands of professional action photographers at major events. It’s a big, tough piece of gear that’s built to go fast and resist the elements. It doesn’t get any tougher than this.

Until the memory card is full, you’ll be able to shoot 20.1MP still shots at a pace of 16fps. The camera’s performance for action is truly limitless, and it’s backed up with an astounding battery life of nearly 3,000 photos (which in real use for continuous shooting is much higher, too). The subject-tracking autofocus performance is likewise outstanding.

The EOS 1D X III isn’t only a great action camera; it can also shoot 5.5K RAW 10-bit video at 60 frames per second. Be warned: those video files are massive, so you’ll need to save up for a few pricey CFexpress cards. Unlike rival DSLRs, Canon’s Dual Pixel AF performs admirably in Live View, providing nearly identical AF performance to when using the brilliant optical viewfinder. The only significant drawback is that this third installment of the 1D X series has seen a price increase.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: Mirrorless
Lens Mount: Fujifilm G
Sensor: (Digital) Medium format
Resolution: 102MP
Viewfinder: EVF 3,690K dots
Screen: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 2,360K dots
Autofocus: 425-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 5fps
Max video resolution: 4K up to 30fps

REASONS TO BUY:

It’s a 100MP medium format camera!
Effective IBIS
Aggressive price point

REASONS TO AVOID:

Heavy when paired with GF lenses
No vertical grip
 

When only digital medium format will suffice, Fujifilm and Hasselblad are the two current contenders for your attention. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages, and Fujifilm, as evidenced by the new GFX100S, is undoubtedly pushing the boundaries further. The Fujifilm GFX100S, like the Fujifilm GFX100, has a 102MP medium format sensor. What made the news, though, was a nearly unimaginable price drop of about 50 percent.

Because the camera now only stores a single battery unit, the GFX100S loses the vertical grip and the battery life is decreased to a still-respectable 460 shots. The camera is around two-thirds the size and weight of the GFX100, which is a benefit. Yes, all of that medium format magic is contained in a DSLR-sized body. Oh, and there’s also in-body stabilization.

In terms of medium format, the GFX100S features some impressive X-Series technology, including a generally responsive autofocus mechanism. If that’s not enough, there’s also a new 400MP high-resolution mode (combining 16 shots using pixel shifting). The GFX100S, being a Fujifilm, is also a nice-looking camera. Overall, the GFX100S is the most appealing alternative to DSLRs or full-frame mirrorless cameras.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: Mirrorless
Lens Mount: Panasonic (Leica) L
Sensor: Full-frame
Resolution: 47MP
Viewfinder: EVF 5,760K dots
Screen: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 2,100K dots
Autofocus: 225-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 9fps
Max video resolution: 5K up to 30fps/ 4K up to 60fps

REASONS TO BUY:

Excellent build quality
Gorgeous EVF
Decent photo and video performer

REASONS TO AVOID:

AF system behind the competition
A little bulky
Battery life
 

The Panasonic Lumix S1R was the company’s first step into the full-frame mirrorless camera market, and it’s an outstanding camera. The business has also spent no time in establishing the system, with regular releases of new L-Mount lenses that have already covered nearly all traditional pro options, including the 24-70mm and 70-200mm f/2.8.

And what about the S1R? It’s the 47MP high-resolution variant, which is perfect for landscape photography in particular. It’s also a capable video performer, as one would expect from Panasonic. The S1R has already received five firmware updates, the most recent of which included 5K/30fps video recording in addition to the existing 4K/60fps 10-bit video.

The S1R is larger and heavier in the hand than the competition, and it offers no advantages over a DSLR. The ergonomics are excellent, the build quality is excellent, and the 5.76-million-dot EVF provides a fantastic viewing experience. The only significant drawbacks are that the autofocus is the least effective among full-frame high-resolution cameras, and we’d like longer battery life. However, as with other modern cameras, it is possible to charge it through USB-C on the move.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: Mirrorless
Lens Mount: Nikon Z
Sensor: Full-frame
Resolution: 45.7MP
Viewfinder: 3,680K dots
Screen: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 2,100K dots
Autofocus: 493-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K up to 60fps

REASONS TO BUY:

Excellent handling
Nikon Z lens mount has huge potential
Superb stills image quality
Competitive price

REASONS TO AVOID:

Better AF elsewhere
Not the best image stabilization
Limited EVF performance
 

Today’s greatest mirrorless camera from Nikon is the Z7 II. It competes against the Sony A7R IV and Panasonic S1R in our roundup as a high-resolution flagship with exceptional picture quality and dynamic range. The Z7 II, for the most part, holds its own, and at a reduced price.

Perhaps the most exciting aspect of the Nikon Z7 II is the system it belongs to. The Nikon Z lens mount is the most versatile full-frame lens mount available today, with the greatest diameter and lowest flange distance in a full-frame lens mount, and thus the largest angle of incidence.

If you’re scratching your head right now, you should know that the larger the angle of incidence, the easier it is to create high-performance lenses. We’re starting to see some pretty fascinating lenses two years after the system was debuted, and regular lenses like the 50mm f/1.8 Z have great edge-to-edge clarity. If you’re starting from scratch and want to buy a camera system as a whole, the Nikon Z series might be for you — and the Z7 II is the crown gem.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: Mirrorless
Lens Mount: Fujifilm G
Sensor: Medium Format
Resolution: 50MP
Viewfinder: 3.69m-dot EVF
Screen: 3.2-inch 3-way tilting touchscreen, 2,360K dots
Autofocus: 425-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 3fps
Max video resolution: 1080p up to 30fps

REASONS TO BUY:

Relatively affordable
Superb image quality 
Well-performing image stabilization

REASONS TO AVOID:

No 4K video
Comparatively sluggish AF
Not good for sport/action
 

Unlike some of the other cameras on our list, which are capable of a wide range of shooting situations, the GFX 50S II was created with one goal in mind: great image quality and incredible detail resolution. It has a medium-format sensor that is 1.7x larger than full-frame sensors seen in mirrorless and DSLR cameras.

With a larger sensor, you get improved low-light performance, exceptional detail, and a wide dynamic range. With a camera like this, it’s much more difficult to shoot swiftly and quickly – but it may be fine depending on the type of photographer you are.

If you’re a landscape or portrait photographer, it could be ideal, but sports and action photographers will be put off by the sluggish AF system and slow frame rates (3fps).

We now have IBIS (in-body image stabilization) for the first time in a GFX body, which provides a remarkable 6.5 stops of camera shake compensation. That’s fantastic news for anyone shooting handheld, as it means this camera may now be used as a walkabout camera, which was previously impossible with medium format cameras.

Other features, like the lack of 4K video recording, are arguably disappointing, but given that this isn’t a camera intended for videographers, that’s acceptable.

In essence, Fujifilm has created a cost-effective medium-format camera. It may not be your only camera, but bringing it to market at a fair price, allows professionals to add something to their kit bag that is perfect for certain scenarios that necessitate it.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: Mirrorless
Lens Mount: Micro Four Thirds
Sensor: Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.3MP
Viewfinder: EVF 2,360K dots
Screen: 3.0-inch articulating touchscreen, 1,037K dots
Autofocus: 121-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 18/60fps
Max video resolution: 4K up to 30fps

REASONS TO BUY:

Excellent handling
Great for action
Fantastic image stabilization

REASONS TO AVOID:

Image quality suffers in low light
Viewfinder clarity in low light
Overwhelming menus
 
The Olympus OM-D E-M1X is a technological marvel, designed specifically for action photography. The mechanical and electronic shutters enable up to 18fps and 60fps for continuous shooting at 20.3MP, respectively, with no actual limit to the sequence duration. If your reflexes aren’t quite up to par, there’s also a Pro capture option that takes 35 images before you touch the shutter.
 
The E-M1X, like other Olympus OM-D cameras, is a joy to use on a daily basis, fitting nicely in the hand. It is the largest and heaviest Micro Four Thirds camera available, and it is as solid as a rock. When compared to large format competition, the image quality in low light is undoubtedly lacking, but there are plenty of reasons to choose the E-M1X instead – especially for action photography.
Its comparable lenses are substantially smaller and lighter than those of its competitors.
 
Take, for example, the new 150-400mm f/4.5 TC 1.25x lens, which has a maximum equivalent reach of 1200mm and is backed with perhaps the best camera image stabilization available today, as well as a new bird autofocus mode. At like-for-like apertures, the smaller sensor format also provides you more depth of field, which is good for those long focal lengths. Even if Olympus is in a state of change, it’s a win-win situation for action photographers.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: DSLR
Lens Mount: Nikon F
Sensor: Full-frame
Resolution: 45.4MP
Viewfinder: OVF, 0.75x mag
Screen: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 2,359K dots
Autofocus: 153-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 7fps
Max video resolution: 4K up to 30fps

REASONS TO BUY:

Great all-rounder
Significant battery life
Excellent image quality at ISO 64

REASONS TO AVOID:

Video performance can’t match mirrorless
Sluggish Live View focusing speed
 
The Nikon D850 is our recommendation if you’re a DSLR user who can’t quite bring yourself to buy a mirrorless camera just yet. The D850 is well-suited to landscape photography, thanks to its 45.4MP sensor and class-leading image quality at ISO 64. You’ll also appreciate the tried-and-true autofocus mechanism inherited from the action-focused Nikon D5, which can handle more demanding situations like weddings and even action photography.

The camera is nearly bomb-proof in terms of construction, with complete weather-sealing, a long battery life, and a fantastically huge and bright optical viewfinder. This is a camera on which you may rely. DSLR technology is also far less expensive than mirrorless rivals when taken as a whole, with like-for-like lenses often costing two-thirds as much.

The video performance of a Nikon DSLR is clearly inferior to that of mirrorless competitors. While you can still take beautiful 4K films, Live View autofocus is sluggish at best, and in-body stabilization is not available. Also, with a 7fps continuous shooting rate limited to sequences of about 50 photos, this isn’t a true action camera.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Type: Mirrorless
Lens Mount: Sony FE
Sensor: Full-frame
Resolution: 61MP
Viewfinder: EVF 5,760K dots
Screen: 3.0-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,440K dots
Autofocus: 567-area AF
Max continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K up to 30fps

REASONS TO BUY:

Class-leading resolution
IBIS effective to 5.5EV
Lovely EVF
AF performance

REASONS TO AVOID:

Touchscreen control is limited
Control layout is a little fiddly
Less suited to action
 
The Sony A7R IV, which was our camera of the year in 2019, is still a formidable camera two years later. Its class-leading 61MP resolution, which is still unsurpassed in full-frame today and holds its own against the digital medium format, was the focus of attention. With a 26.2MP resolution in the APS-C crop mode, the extra pixels offer massive printing and unequaled cropping flexibility.
 
The A7R IV offers a great dynamic range, even at such a high resolution, and can record 10fps sequences with continuous autofocus thanks to the capable Bionz X processor, albeit sequence length is limited. There’s also Sony’s tried-and-true autofocus technology and adequate in-body image stabilization. The A7R IV was what raising the bar looked like in 2019, with its gorgeous 5.76-million dot EVF and 120fps refresh rate.
 
Although video performance is good, it is currently outsmarted by competitors. The 4K videos up to 30fps benefit from a number of Sony colour profiles while being downscaled from 6K. With the recent debut of the Sony FE 50mm f/1.2 G lens, the system now has 60 native lenses to choose from (and soon followed by three more primes). Sony has been a pioneer in camera technology for years, and real-world performance largely backs up the stats.

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